About Brooklyn Integers

  1. What is this?
  2. Are you a monopoly?
  3. Is there a mobile version?
  4. Is there an API?
  5. Are there permalinks for integers?
  6. Are there short URLs for integers?
  7. A short history of Brooklyn Integers
  8. The long version

What is this?

Brooklyn Integers is an independently owned and operated integer-as-a-service provider. All integers are hand-crafted and guaranteed to be unique and hella-beautiful.

Really?

Really.

Are you a monopoly?

Not at all. After all, our motto is we have infinity on our side. There are plenty of numbers for everyone!

If Brooklyn Integers aren't to your taste we encourage you to head over to our friends at Mission Integers, located in the heart of San Francisco's historic Mission District, or London Integers and sample their finely crafted numbers.

Is there a mobile version?

Yes. Brooklyn Intergers uses a fully responsive design so you can easily create artisanal integers on the go!

Is there an API?

Yes.

For example, to request a new hand-crafted integer you would say:

curl -X POST -F method=brooklyn.integers.create http://api.brooklynintegers.com/rest/

{
    "integer": 2031617, 
    "shorturl": "http://brooklynts.com/bpVT", 
    "stat": "ok"
}

Please consult the API documentation for complete details.

Are there permalinks for integers?

You bet! Every integer created is given a safe and supportive home on Brooklyn Integers.

Are there short URLs for integers?

Yes. Brooklyn Integers uses base-58 encoding and the brooklynts.com domain for short URLs.

For example:

curl -v http://brooklynts.com/bpVT

> GET /bpVT HTTP/1.1
> User-Agent: curl/7.21.3
> Host: brooklynts.com
> Accept: */*

< HTTP/1.1 302 Found
< Date: Sun, 22 Jul 2012 13:33:47 GMT
< Server: Apache/2.2.22
< location: http://www.brooklynintegers.com/int/2031617/
< Content-Length: 0
< Content-Type: text/html

Brooklyn Integers is also a proud supporter of the RevCanonical initiative.

Really?

Totally.

A short history of Brooklyn Integers

Message-ID: <500A9EDF.2020803>
Date: Sat, 21 Jul 2012 08:21:51 -0400
From: Aaron Straup Cope
To: Gary Gale

Well, at this point it has evolved in to a very elaborate joke.

But.

It is worth noting that one of the really nice things about parallel-flickr is the ability to merge multiple instances back in to a single larger version. Because it's all based on Flickr IDs which are unique out of necessity then you have the ability to reconstruct the "network" of users and photos.

Remember: I never bought the magic decentralized distributed pony nonsense. I have no problem, in principle, with big centralized services.

Something like privatesquare does not have this luxury since, by its nature, it is a "looking glass archive". Lots of things in privatesquare never end up getting foursquare (checkin) IDs since they are... well, private.

Which started me thinking, a few months ago: That for every privatesquare checkin I would generate a static map and upload it to a private Flickr account and then just use the photo ID as the privatesquare checkin ID. (And by extension make the maps themselves a little more durable.)

Which started me thinking, a few minutes after that: You could just use Flickr as a great big ticket server in the sky: Simply upload a 1 x 1 pixel image and record the photo ID and purge stuff shortly afterwards. Basically this, but using Flickr (or any other service) as your database:

http://code.flickr.com/.../ticket-servers-distributed-unique-primary-keys-on-the-cheap/

All of which made the people I still know at Flickr very very uncomfortable and then Mike started joking about doing Mission Integers, which is the sibling and genesis of Brooklyn Integers.

You know: (unique) integers as a service.

All of which came to a head over lunch on Monday when I told Mike he would have to build Mission Integers and/or I would finally have to get off my ass and do the Brooklyn version) because I would need it for the work at [redacted] and so here we are.

Basically we just have a gentleman's agreement to honour each other's offsets.

Because Mission Street runs North/South and because Stamen Design is located on the right hand side of the street at 2017 I get the odd numbers (right hand coast) and he gets the even ones (left hand coast).

No, really.


The long version

Rev. Dan Catt has written an excellent blog post about artisanal integers titled: London Artisan Integers; distribution, Hotel Infinity, punk, an excuse & explanation of sorts